AMD EPYC Genoa with 96 Zen 4 cores is an insanely fast chip that crushes every other x86 processor in leaked benchmarks

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AMD EPYC CPUs Significantly Outperform Intel Xeon In Cloud Servers, Study Reveals

The latest benchmarks of AMD’s upcoming EPYC Genoa 96 core CPU based on the Zen 4 core architecture have been leaked Yuuki_AnS. The leaked benchmarks show record-breaking x86 performance, and this is from an engineering sample.

AMD’s EPYC Genoa 96 Core “Zen 4” CPU crushes every single x86 processor on the market

The leaked AMD EPYC Genoa 9000 chip is one of the many Zen 4 server CPUs that the red team will launch for the server market later this year. We recently covered the specs for the entire lineup from the same source, and now Yuuki_AnS has released the very first benchmarks showing monstrous performance for the engineering sample.

The AMD EPYC Genoa CPUs will pack up to a whopping 96 cores and 192 threads in a single chip. Here you can see two of those chips running on the same platform with a total of 192 cores and 384 threads. (Image credit: Yuuki_AnS)

The specific OPN code and SKU naming of the AMD EPYC Genoa CPU has not been mentioned, but we suspect that this could be the EPYC 9654P, which is one of the SKUs that share the same specs, which is 96 cores and 192 threads based on the Zen 4 core architecture include . The chip rocks 384 MB of L3 cache and has a base frequency of 2.15 GHz. Boost frequencies are designed for 3.05 GHz for all cores, 3.5-3.7 GHz single-core frequencies, and a 3.5 GHz operating frequency with light loads. Under full load, the chip draws 360 watts of power, which is a very reasonable number considering Intel’s chips have a maximum power limit of over 700 watts.

“Preliminary” specifications of the AMD EPYC 9000 Genoa CPU SKUs:

CPU name cores / threads cache clock speeds TDP Federal State
EPYC 9654P 96/192 384MB 2.0-2.15GHz 360W production ready
EPYK 9534 64/128 256MB 2.3-2.4GHz 280W production ready
EPYC 9454P 48/96 256MB 2.25-2.35GHz 290W production ready
EPYK 9454 48/96 256MB 2.25-2.35GHz 290W production ready
EPYC 9354P 32/64 256MB 2.75-2.85GHz 280W production ready
EPYK 9354 32/64 256MB 2.75-2.85GHz 280W production ready
EPYK 9334 32/64 128MB 2.3-2.5GHz 210W production ready
EPYC 9274F 24/48 256MB 3.4-3.6GHz 320W production ready
EPYK 9254 24/48 128MB 2.4-2.5GHz 200W production ready
EPYK 9224 24/48 64MB 2.15-2.25GHz 200W production ready
EPYC 9174F 16/32 256MB 3.6-3.8GHz 320W production ready
EPYK 9124 16/32 64MB 2.6-2.7GHz 200W production ready
EPYC 9000 (ES) 96/192 384MB 2.0-2.15GHz 320-400W IT
EPYC 9000 (ES) 84/168 384MB 2.0GHz 290W IT
EPYC 9000 (ES) 64/128 256MB 2.5-2.65GHz 320-400W IT
EPYC 9000 (ES) 48/96 256MB 3.2-3.4GHz 360W IT
EPYC 9000 (ES) 32/64 256MB 3.2-3.4GHz 320W IT
EPYC 9000 (ES) 32/64 256MB 2.7-2.85GHz 260W IT

AMD’s EPYC Genoa 96 Core ES CPU was tested in a dual-socket configuration, for a total of 192 cores and 384 threads. However, existing benchmarks don’t support more than 128 cores as mentioned by the leaker, and performance was measured in Windows Server 2025 preview, so we’re dealing with a very unoptimized testing ecosystem. It states that the performance gap between the ES part tested here and the final version will be huge, so we can expect even higher performance on the retail chips.

AMD EPYC Genoa 96 Core & Intel Sapphire Rapids-SP CPU benchmarks (Image credit: Yuuki_AnS):

Xeon Platinum 8480+ (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480 (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

EPYC 7773X (64 x 2 Milan-X)

Xeon Platinum 8280L (28×8 CSL-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8380 (40 x 2 ICL-SP)

0

15000

30000

45000

60000

75000

90000

Xeon Platinum 8280L (28×8 CSL-SP)

EPYC 7773X (2 x 64 Milan-X)

Xeon Platinum 8380 (40 x 2 ICL-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480+ (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480 (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

The shared performance metrics are in different versions of CPU-z, V-Ray and the very popular Cinebench benchmarks. In CPU-z v17, the AMD EPYC Genoa 96 Core CPU scored 740.2 points in the single-thread and 73057.5 points in the multi-thread benchmark. In the CPU-z AVX-512, the chip scored 627.2 points in the single-core and 15625.1 points in the multi-core test. For comparison, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX with 64 Zen 2 cores has a multithreaded performance score of 30,917, which is a 2.36x improvement in multithreaded performance. In the leaked benchmark results comparing the chip to unreleased Sapphire Rapids SP offerings, the CPU lags behind in single-threaded benchmarks but beats its rival in multi-threaded workloads.

0

15000

30000

45000

60000

75000

90000

EPYC 7773X (64 x 2 Milan-X)

Xeon Platinum 8480+ (2 x 56 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8380 (2 x 40 ICL-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480 (2 x 56 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8280L (28×8 CSL-SP)

In V-Ray, the chip scored 88,300 points in the multi-core benchmark test. For comparison, AMD’s own Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5995WX benchmarks show a performance score of 60,111 for the 64-core Zen 3 chip. That’s a huge 47% improvement, but note that this isn’t even the final form of the 96-core Genoa flagship. In the leaked benchmarks, the chip offers a 4.5% CPU performance improvement over its predecessor, the EPYC 7773X, which is expected given the low clock speeds at which the ES chip was operating.

0

16796

33592

50388

67184

83980

100776

EPYC 7773X (64 x 2 Milan-X)

Xeon Platinum 8280L (28×8 CSL-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480+ (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8480 (56 x 2 SPR-SP)

Xeon Platinum 8380 (40 x 2 ICL-SP)

Finally, we have the Cinebench performance benchmarks tested in all three versions (R15, R20, R23). In Cinebench R15, the chip scored 188 points in single-core and 11,577 points in multi-core, in Cinebench R20 the chip scored 416 points in single-core and 26,285 points in multi-core, while in Cinebench R23 the chip scored 1227 points in the single-core and 100,776 points in the multi-core test. This is where the CPU crushes Intel offerings, but note that only 128 cores are used across all three versions, and also at a lower clock speed that’s a far cry from their final all-core boost of 3.05GHz.

AMD’s EPYC Genoa CPUs have 128 PCIe Gen 5.0 lanes, 160 for a 2P (dual-socket) configuration. The SP5 platform will also offer DDR5-5200 memory support, which is a crazy improvement over the existing DDR4-3200MHz DIMMs. But that’s not all, it also supports up to 12 DDR5 memory channels and 2 DIMMs per channel, allowing up to 3TB of system memory with 128GB modules. The AMD EPYC 9000 Genoa CPU series is expected to be released in the second half of this year.

Size comparison between AMD EPYC Milan Zen 3 and EPYC Genoa Zen 4:

CPU name AMD EPYC Milan AMD EPYC Genoa
process node TSMC7nm TSMC5nm
core architecture Zen 3 Zen 4
Zen CCD die size 80mm2 72mm2
Zen IOD Die Size 416mm2 397mm2
Substrate (packaging) area open 5428mm2
socket area 4410mm2 6080mm2
socket name LGA 4094 LGA6096
Maximum socket TDP 450W 700W

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