Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) – Apple’s New MacOS Ventura and the End of the Intel Era: Here’s Everything We Know

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Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) - Apple's New MacOS Ventura and the End of the Intel Era: Here's Everything We Know

apple inc‘s (NASDAQ: AAPL) macOS gets a refresh with its upcoming thirteenth version, nicknamed Ventura.

While most users will have to wait this fall to try out the new version of the Cupertino giant’s next operating system, developers have had access to a preview for some time, meaning there’s a lot of information out there about this iteration of macOS. Here’s everything you need to know.

What happened: MacOS Ventura introduces many new features to Apple’s computing ecosystem and underscores the company’s increasing reliance on its own ARM-based silicon as it slowly nears the end of the year Intel Corp.-based (NASDAQ:INTC) era.

This is especially true as some of the new features will only be supported on company processors and not on Intel-based Macs.

See also: APPLE STOCK FORECAST

stage manager: The latest iteration of macOS introduced the Stage Manager – a window and application manager that is especially useful on devices with small screens. This feature makes it much faster and easier to switch between multiple apps when multitasking and improves window management.

When a user turns on the stage manager from the control center, their screen is arranged in a way that eliminates clutter and only shows the application they are currently using. It’s possible to switch between apps already running by clicking an icon in a column on the left, which will move that app to the middle, while the other apps will move to that column instead.

You can also drag an open app out of the column to use it alongside the active app, and the system will remember these apps are used together on the screen when you switch again.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to change the order of the applications in the column and the column becomes confusing from about 12 applications. Another downside is that enabling the Stage Manager also hides the desktop, meaning it takes more steps to drag documents from the desktop into the application – possibly a good incentive to use folders created in the Finder app instead of cluttering the desktop.

Live subtitles: Ventura is also introducing live closed captioning, a feature that enables live transcription of audio conversations, such as during Zoom calls

Another addition is an overhauled Finder interface that makes windows look the same as before, but with a redesigned and less cumbersome share extension.

Ventura’s system settings have been changed to more closely resemble the settings on iOS. The settings are also organized differently, which takes some getting used to.

Headlight: The Spotlight search tool now also presents relevant photos in searches, can present long lists of results in a smaller space, and displays recently visited websites below the results. Pressing the spacebar while a search result is selected now shows a quick view of the result.

Apps: With Ventura, an iOS-like clock app has also found its way to the Mac. The iOS weather app has made its way to macOS, and the two systems have become even more closely intertwined with the introduction of a feature that allows users to use their iPhone’s camera as a webcam.

This feature works seamlessly when an iPhone 11 or later with the same Apple ID is connected to the same Wi-Fi network. The studio light features included on the iPhone 12 or later are also supported.

This new macOS version also adds Handoff support in Facetime, meaning you can seamlessly switch from one device to another without dropping the call.

master key: MacOS 13 also takes Apple’s first steps toward eliminating the password by implementing what the company calls a passkey. Instead, when a website asks a user to create a password, the system asks for the generation of a master key, which is based on biometrics and works on all of the user’s devices.

The Photos app gets an impressive new smart feature: a copy subject option, available by clicking on an image in the app, copies the main subject of the image to the clipboard while removing the background for pasting into an editing application can or any other software that accepts images as input.

Mail, Messenger: Apple has also revamped the Mail and Messages apps. When it comes to mail, a counterintuitive feature slows down email sending: the message is sent 10 seconds after the button is clicked, allowing the user to catch errors and prevent sending.

The application also recognizes when the user did not specify a subject or mentions an attachment in the body but then did not attach anything to the email.

Airtime can also now be scheduled, but requires the device to be turned on at the scheduled time. Messages add an option to edit or retract messages, but they remain visible if the recipient has an older iOS device.

Silicon Macs get more love: According to a report by NotebookCheck, the Cupertino-based giant is focusing its development on the Macs that run chips designed by the company.

Intel-based Macs released before 2016 will never get the Ventura update as Apple seems to be slowly starting to phase out non-silicon Macs. In fact, Mac mini users can only update their device if it was released in 2018 or later.

Additionally, Macs without Apple silicon don’t have access to the new Sidecar Reference mode, which allows users to use the M1-equipped 12.9-inch iPad Pro as a mini-LED display to enjoy its high contrast and color accuracy to use.

Similarly, the live captions feature mentioned above will only be rolling out on Macs running Apple silicon and iOS devices including the iPhone 11. This feature leverages the Neural Engine machine learning cores found in the A12 Bionic chip and up, and M-series chips, not present in Intel silicon.

Finally, a new dictation mode that allows emojis and automatically inserts punctuation marks will be introduced on Apple Silicon Macs with M-series processors.

Photo courtesy of Apple.

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